1. (Source: rory-williams, via veraflynns)

  2. jamesforester:

It’s good morning and superior week from Schonti and like Nur Uretmen usually wishes; peace and love!

    jamesforester:

    It’s good morning and superior week from Schonti and like Nur Uretmen usually wishes; peace and love!

  3. Since I Saw You Last - BTS (x)

    (Source: fuckyeahgarybarlow)

  4. thesonicscrew:

    did he fucking decapitate someone?

    (Source: theworldofcinema, via followersoframbaldi)

  5. montereybayaquarium:

Exxon Valdez — 25 Years Later
When the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska 25 years ago, the Monterey Bay Aquarium sea otter team was among the first responders to the March 24, 1989 disaster. We were the only institution on the West Coast with experience rescuing and raising ill and orphaned sea otters, and we played a central role in setting up two emergency centers that cleaned and cared for surviving otters. (Between 1,000 and 5,500 sea otters died in the spill.)
We also brought two orphaned pups to Monterey (similar to the pup shown above) and raised them until they found homes at the Vancouver Aquarium.
This year, the sea otter population in Prince William Sound was finally declared recovered from the effects of the spill. For other species, the picture hasn’t been as rosy. A resident killer whale population may go extinct; the pigeon guillemot seabirds found in the region and a once-robust herring fishery have not bounced back.
We may finally know why.
New research on crude oil impacts
There’s new evidence, published this year by our partners at the Tuna Research and Conservation Center, that for the first time pinpoints significant long-term impacts from crude oil on ocean wildlife. Their published studies, conducted in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, document how crude oil affects the developing hearts of larval fishes caught in spills. They also show a possible link between compounds in oil and long-term risks to cardiac health in many animals exposed to the compounds – including sea otters and even humans.
Even before we opened our doors to the public in 1984, the Aquarium began caring for stranded and orphaned California sea otters. Today, 30 years later, we’re more involved than ever – and in more ways than ever – on behalf of a future with healthy oceans.
A sobering reminder
The 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill is a sobering reminder of how much is at stake.
It’s also a reminder that we can make a difference: if we’re prepared to respond, if we invest in scientific research to understand long-term impacts, and when we work for policies that protect key species and critical ocean ecosystems.
The Aquarium is active on all these fronts – and working just as hard to inspire new generations who will give a voice to ocean issues. We couldn’t do it without your help.
Learn more about our ocean conservation programs.
Donate to support our ocean conservation work.

    montereybayaquarium:

    Exxon Valdez — 25 Years Later

    When the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska 25 years ago, the Monterey Bay Aquarium sea otter team was among the first responders to the March 24, 1989 disaster. We were the only institution on the West Coast with experience rescuing and raising ill and orphaned sea otters, and we played a central role in setting up two emergency centers that cleaned and cared for surviving otters. (Between 1,000 and 5,500 sea otters died in the spill.)

    We also brought two orphaned pups to Monterey (similar to the pup shown above) and raised them until they found homes at the Vancouver Aquarium.

    This year, the sea otter population in Prince William Sound was finally declared recovered from the effects of the spill. For other species, the picture hasn’t been as rosy. A resident killer whale population may go extinct; the pigeon guillemot seabirds found in the region and a once-robust herring fishery have not bounced back.

    We may finally know why.

    New research on crude oil impacts

    There’s new evidence, published this year by our partners at the Tuna Research and Conservation Center, that for the first time pinpoints significant long-term impacts from crude oil on ocean wildlife. Their published studies, conducted in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, document how crude oil affects the developing hearts of larval fishes caught in spills. They also show a possible link between compounds in oil and long-term risks to cardiac health in many animals exposed to the compounds – including sea otters and even humans.

    Even before we opened our doors to the public in 1984, the Aquarium began caring for stranded and orphaned California sea otters. Today, 30 years later, we’re more involved than ever – and in more ways than ever – on behalf of a future with healthy oceans.

    A sobering reminder

    The 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill is a sobering reminder of how much is at stake.

    It’s also a reminder that we can make a difference: if we’re prepared to respond, if we invest in scientific research to understand long-term impacts, and when we work for policies that protect key species and critical ocean ecosystems.

    The Aquarium is active on all these fronts – and working just as hard to inspire new generations who will give a voice to ocean issues. We couldn’t do it without your help.

    Learn more about our ocean conservation programs.

    Donate to support our ocean conservation work.

  6. youlovelucie:

    witchyroses:

    This is the reason gifsets were invented

    friendly reminder that this wasn’t in the script - they were just messing around on set one day and this happened.

    (via musefulstranger)

  7. gillovny2011:

    #Passive Aggressively Sharing Our Confused Possibly Quasi-Platonic Feelings Via Our Fictional Characters

  8. How do you make the flowers for the flower crown? like specifically what material is it? Its super cool and I want to make one I just don't know what I need.

    soresoftheopenheart:

    Hmm, I just reblogged it from another site, but I think I can help you in terms of what to buy and how to do it. If you click the link, it’ll take you to the complete photo post that shows you what you need. In any event, here’s the list:

    • Nail polish
    • Floral wire, a thin bendable wire is ideal. 26 Gauge is fine. imageimage
    • Floral Tape            image
    • Wire cutters/scissors
    • a pencil or cylindrical object to wrap the petals around
    • Ribbon (optional)

    DIRECTIONS

    1. First, you’re gonna need to make the crown. You can do this by using the wire you already have or you can use an old headband or anything that you like that resembles a headpiece. Thicker wire is also fine for this step.image       As you can see, OP twisted two pieces of wire together and left loops at the end (to attach the ribbon). Then they covered it in brown floral tape.
    2. The second step is to make the flowers. Using your pencil/cylindrical object, twist the wire around it to create a ‘petal’. Repeat this until you have at least a couple of petals. 3-6 is usually fine, it’s really your call. image
    3. SLIGHTLY bend the petals back to create a natural looking petal.image
    4. After you are satisfied with the shape of your petals, cut out your flower, leaving some wire left to attach it to your crown. 
    5.  Repeat the first few steps and make the rest of your flowers.
    6. Take one of your flowers and CAREFULLY apply nail polish to it, one petal at a time. Think of it like making bubbles. It may be easier to pour the nail polish in a flat plate and dip it, or dip the entire flower into the polish.imageRepeat this for all your remaining flowers.
    7. Twist the two ends of your flowers together to form a ‘stem’.image
    8. Wrap the stems with floral tape, preferably with the same color you used in the base of the crown.imageRepeat this for all your remaining flowers.
    9. The third step will be attaching the flowers to your crown. You can do this a few ways. One way is to wrap the stems around the crown. Another way is to just wrap the stems with floral tape as you go along, like the OP did.imageDo this until all your flowers have been attached to your crown.
    10. At this point, you can tie the ribbons to the loops like OP did, or decorate it any other way you like. :)

    image

    Enjoy your new floral crown!

    TIPS

    • You can purchase most of the items in Walmart, Michael’s or any craft or flower store. You can also order it online. :)
    • REMEMBER, this tutorial is just a guide. If you don’t want to use brown floral tape or if you prefer using the green floral wire, don’t be afraid to change it up. You can use any color or material your heart desires.

    This is the link to the DIY Floral Crown post. 

    Sorry for replying late. I hope this helps you with making your own crown. :)

  9. tastefullyoffensive:

    Animals Wearing Hoodies

    Previously: Animals Wearing Dinosaur Costumes

    (via rodarawr)

Melani Sub Rosa © by Rafael Martin